King’s palace Museum

Spare time for a tour to King’s palace museum in Nyanza to learn the Rwandan people and culture. Learn the evolution of traditional clothing and types of residences through the centuries, as well as economic activities like agriculture. The reconstruction of the traditional royal residence, the King’s Palace is a beautifully-crafted thatched dwelling shaped like a beehiBuilt in 1989 with the help of the Belgian government.  The museum also offers a detailed insight into the country’s tragic history. In the past generations, Nyanza was a site of battles and power struggles therefore reffered to as heart of Rwanda. The capital of the kingdom had as many as 1950-2,000 inhabitants, and built hunts with the same shapes and paintings.

Behind the hunt lived the honored long-horned Inyambo cattl attend too by the keepers who sang for them, keeping alive unique tradition.

The treasured cows were derived from the wider Ankole breed. They were decorated with expensive  jewellery and played an important role during ceremonies in honour of the king. You can find out about the breeding techniques and listen to the amahamba songs the shepherds sang as part of the grooming process for the cows. They moved gently on the songs for their trainer. Up to date Inyambo still exisits in some farms in Rwanda however some have cross breed with other types.

 The King’s Palace is atrategically located on a hill 2km southwest of town. It mainly concerns royal resisdence than ancient history. The entertainment both songs and dances displays a replica king’s ‘palace. This tour is inclusive of a guide who takes you through and thoroughly explains to understand the architectural ideas in the Rwanda palace. Expect to why the royal beer brewer’s hut had an entrance without a lip, and why the woman who looked after the king’s milk was never married offf.
The king majorly received furniture and gifts, stolen during the tragic war between the Hutu and Tusti (genocide)from people who visited him. Besides that its still a fascinating home to be visited including three sitting rooms and the best clean and organised room was reserved for receiving white people. The unique part of it, Mutara was the first mwami (king) to convert to Catholicism.